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A sweet slice of the country

Apple, cherry or peach—the all-American fruit pie has evolved into the most traditional of desserts.


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There's just nothing like the smell of a warm pie baking in the oven to conjure up fond childhood memories of home cooking. Whether it is apple, cherry, or peach—the all-American fruit pie has evolved into the most traditional of desserts. The average American now eats six slices of pie a year and these days, what says good old fashioned fun more than a pie just like mom used to make.

One of the most popular sources of pies in the state is Ikeda's, a fruit stand in Auburn run by a longtime family farm.

"Our pies are excellent, whether it's apple, a berry, a peach or an apricot," said Glen Ikeda. "We use all natural ingredients, no preservatives. We hand cut all the fruits that go into our pies and all the fruit we use is the mature fruit that we can't put on the decks. They go in the pies. And that typically will make a better tasting pie because the fruit has so much more sugar and more ripeness."

Glen still operates the same farm his parents did nearly a half-century earlier, making it one of the oldest and largest in the Placer County.

In San Mateo County, Duarte's Tavern of Pescadero has used local fruit to make pies that have been cherished for more than 40 years.

Duarte's makes and sells scores of pies from locally grown ollalieberries, which are a cross between a youngberry, loganberry and blackberry.

The ollalieberry pie has stood the test of time, as Life magazine recently named it one of the best in America.

For more information, visit www.duartestavern.com and www.ikedas.com.


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